I love butter and sugar.

Mexican Wedding Cookies

Posted on: June 1, 2009

Mexican Wedding Cookies after dusting

I’ve been perusing all of the cookie and dessert recipes that I have to pick out recipes that will allow me to put a bigger dent into the five-pound bag of almonds that I have, and I came across one cookie recipe for which I’ve often received compliments: Mexican wedding cookies.

According to traditional Mexican culture, when a couple is married, each of these cookies is wrapped in brightly colored tissue paper, or papel de china, as it is called in Mexico. The cookies are then piled into baskets or cellophane bags and tied with silk ribbons. They are then passed out at the wedding dinner to guests. Although incredibly laborious in terms of the careful packaging and homemade nature of cookie baking, preparing these cookies is an old custom — one that is much loved by those who are lucky enough to receive them as treats.

Grinding almonds with flour

But who says you have to go to a Mexican wedding to enjoy these tasty delights? I’ve made them for my family and friends numerous times, and I knew that they were a winner when my uncle, who usually happily eats the cookies I’ve made for him in silence, e-mailed me shortly after I sent him away with a bag of these cookies and wrote, “What on earth are those little cookies with powdered sugar on them called? They’re amazing!” If someone writes to you to point out how great a cookie is, it must be good. So now whenever I see him and have access to baking supplies, I always make sure to bake a mini batch just for him.

I originally found this recipe in a feature story written by Jacqueline Higuera McMahan in the San Francisco Chronicle several years ago. Lamenting the disappearance of old customs due to the passage of time and the modernization of today’s society, McMahan wanted to revive the tradition of making Mexican wedding cookies when her son was to marry. In her small kitchen all within one day’s time, she handmade 300 of these sweets. Three-hundred! Some of you will think it’s ridiculous to labor over something so seemingly frivolous, but I consider that an act of love.

Dough before chilling

You can use either pecans or almonds to make these cookies, but I’m sure that if you use pecans, the cookie will be a bit richer because the natural fat content of pecans is a higher. McMahan uses vanilla and almond extracts as her main flavoring additions, but I’ve read that you can also use other flavored extracts or even kahlua.

Wedding cookies before powdered sugar dusting

The recipe itself isn’t that clear regarding how to shape the cookies, so I’ll share what I usually do: I’ll take a walnut-sized (the actual shell size, not the itty nut itself!), roll it into a ball, and then flatten it just slightly onto the cookie sheet. The sheets do not need to be greased since the butter content is very high.

The resulting cookie is very crumbly, dry, and lightly sweetened by a small amount of powdered sugar in the dough as well as on the tops. These cookies are best enjoyed with a cup of coffee or tea, or as a slightly indulgent snack anytime during the day.

Mexican wedding cookies

Mexican Wedding Cookies
From Jacqueline Higuera McMahan’s California Rancho Cooking
Yields 33-35 cookies

  • 1 cup pecans or almonds, toasted
  • 2 cups all-purpose unbleached flour
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 cup unsalted butter, slightly softened
  • 1/2 cup powdered sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla
  • 1/4 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 1/4 cups powdered sugar placed in sifter for dusting cookies

Place the toasted nuts, 1 cup of the flour and a pinch of salt into the bowl of a food processor. Lightly grind. The nuts do not have to be really fine. The flour keeps the nuts from becoming too pasty.

In the bowl of a mixer, place the butter and powdered sugar. Beat until well combined, then add the vanilla and almond extracts. Beat just to mix, and then begin adding the flour-nut mixture by 1/2 cupfuls.

Blend in the remaining 1 cup flour and mix just until a dough is formed. If there are dry bits at the bottom of the bowl, use a large spoon to blend or blend with your hands. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and chill the dough for 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 350°.

Place walnut-size pieces of dough on Silpat or a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake for about 18 minutes, or until the edges of the cookies are golden. Cool on racks for 10 minutes.

Dust a sheet of waxed paper with powdered sugar. Place the cookies on top of the sugar and sift more powdered sugar over all. Let them cool and then store in tins. Serve as is or wrap each cookie in an 8-inch square of colored tissue like red, pink, blue, yellow and purple.

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1 Response to "Mexican Wedding Cookies"

I have a big bag of almonds around as well, this looks like a great way to use some. Thanks!

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  • itsgrant: I want to goooo! Me next vacation, hopefully
  • Jesslyn: Thank you so much for posting this! My husband (who spent several years in Korea) and I have been searching for a good recipe that will produce Ho Duc
  • Didi: I have been searching everywhere for a recipe for this dish and this was spot on!! Thanks for making me and my boyfriend VERY happy :)

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