I love butter and sugar.

Financiers

Posted on: June 7, 2009

Financiers

I still have quite a bit of almonds in my pantry, so I thought I’d continue the almond cookie extravaganza and try out the financier recipe in Dorie Greenspan’s Paris Sweets. I’d never had the pleasure of enjoying a financier until about two months ago when Blueberry brought me to T.W. Foods, where at the end of our meal two miniature financier cookies in the shape of madeleines accompanied the check. One bite into this cookie, and I knew I had to call the waitress back to our table and ask her what this little buttery delight was called…

And that was how I learned that I loved financiers.

financiers - mise en place

In a nutshell, financiers came about when a famous Parisian pastry chef named Lasne, whose patisserie was close to the Bourse, Paris’s stock exchange, recognized a problem among his affluent clients: though they were discriminating in taste, they were always in a hurry and rarely had time to sit and enjoy one of his many confections. So Lasne designed this little cake-like cookie so that it could be eaten on the run without the risk of crumbling all over a freshly pressed suit or tie and without a need for a fork or spoon. As Greenspan calls it, financiers are like the “high-class fast food.”

Putting batter into molds

Financiers are as rich as the bankers that they were named for, simply made with ground almonds, sugar, unwhipped egg whites, flour, and a very generous amount of melted butter, which is cooked until it is golden brown. They are traditionally baked in pans that have flat rectangular molds — the reason for this was that the bakers wanted them to resemble little treasured bars of gold — but they are often baked in small boat-shaped molds, madeleine molds, as well as mini muffin pans (especially for people who are not willing to invest in a financier mold pan). My madeleine pan is at my parents’ house, and since I wasn’t willing to buy a real financier mold, I settled on making them in a mini muffin pan — not that I’m dissatisfied at all because I think they turned out quite cute.

Financiers just out of the oven

These cookies are simple, sweet, and tender, resembling mini cakes rather than cookies. Their nutty flavor comes not only from the ground almonds but especially from the browned butter. When making the browned butter, be sure to keep a close watch over it as it bubbles — aim for a golden brown that is not too dark. If you glance away for just a few seconds, your butter could easy go from brown to black. I’d also recommend using a stainless steel pot to brown the butter instead of a non-stick black bottomed pot; this way, it’s easier for you to watch the butter change color.

Another thing I’d suggest is doubling the recipe — after you taste one of these, I’m sure you’ll have wished that you made more.

Financiers on a pretty plate

Financiers
Adapted from Dorie Greenspan’s Paris Sweets, whose recipe came from Paris’s famous Boulangerie-Patisserie Poujauran
Makes 12 cookies in financier molds, or 24 cookies in mini muffin pans

1 1/2 sticks (6 ounces) unsalted butter
1 cup minus two tablespoons sugar
1 cup ground, toasted almonds
6 large egg whites
2/3 cup all-purpose flour

Put the butter in a small saucepan and bring it to a boil over medium heat, swirling the pan occasionally.  Allow the butter to bubble away until it turns a deep brown, but don’t turn your back on the pan – the difference between brown and black is measured in seconds.  Pull the pan from the heat and keep it in a warm place.

Mix the sugar and almonds together in a medium saucepan.  Stir in the egg whites, place the pan over low heat, and, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, heat the mixture until it is runny, slightly white and hot to the touch, about 2 minutes.  Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the flour, then gradually mix in the melted butter.  Transfer the batter to a bowl, cover with plastic wrap, pressing it against the surface of the batter to create an airtight seal, and chill for at least 1 hour.  (The batter can be kept covered in the refrigerator for up to 3 days).

Center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).  Butter 12 rectangular financier molds (1 pan with 3-3/4 x 2 x 5/8-inch [10 x 5 x 1-1/2-cm] rectangular molds that each hold 3 tablespoons, or you can use a mini muffin pan like I did), dust the interiors with flour and tap out the excess.  Place the molds on a baking sheet for easy transport.

Fill each mold almost to the top with batter.  Slide the molds into the oven and bake for about 12-13 minutes, or until the financiers are golden, crowned and springy to the touch.  If necessary, run a blunt knife between the cookies and the sides of the pans, then turn the cookies out of their molds and allow them to cool to room temperature right side up on cooling racks.

Note: Although the batter can be kept in the refrigerator for up to three days, financiers are best enjoyed the day they are baked.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


  • itsgrant: I want to goooo! Me next vacation, hopefully
  • Jesslyn: Thank you so much for posting this! My husband (who spent several years in Korea) and I have been searching for a good recipe that will produce Ho Duc
  • Didi: I have been searching everywhere for a recipe for this dish and this was spot on!! Thanks for making me and my boyfriend VERY happy :)

Categories

%d bloggers like this: