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Archive for the ‘Chocolate’ Category

Chocolate Lace Cookies

In January 2005, a friend and I went to visit the Scharffen Berger chocolate factory in Berkeley, CA, just to see what the chocolate making process was all about. Both of us were dessert and baking fanatics who love chocolate and the Bay Area, and we wanted to visit one of the many, many places that made the Bay Area known for its local goods and artisan treats.

The thing that struck me the most about Scharffen Berger was that it was the very first chocolate company I’d heard of that made a point to tell you how much actual cacao, in percentage terms, there was in their chocolate (then again, I wasn’t a big foodie at the time, so I had no clue that amazing chocolate companies like Varlhona existed). Even fancier companies like Ghirardelli at that point in time didn’t tell you how much there was, and it really matters since the more cacao there is in a piece of chocolate, the more intense your chocolate experience will be.

Blanched and de-skinned almonds

Going on the Scharffen Berger factory tour, I was completely appalled to find out that in order to legally call a piece of milk chocolate “chocolate,” the piece must have at least 10 percent cocoa solids. Yes, you read that right — just 10 percent. A question that might pop into your mind would be — if your milk chocolate bar is only 10 percent chocolate, what’s the other 90 percent consist of? Well, it’s most likely sugar, milk, cocoa butter, lecithins and other emulsifiers. Sounds like a lot of filler to me. The American FDA requirements for bittersweet, semisweet, and dark chocolate are a bit stricter, as bittersweet and semisweet must consist of at least 35 percent cacao, while dark chocolate must have at least 50 percent cacao. So for baking, I’d definitely stick with the bittersweet or dark chocolate over the milk chocolate.

Grinding the de-skinned almonds with oats

Chocolate is pretty complex, though, as a higher percentage of cacao will not necessarily mean better taste. As the cacao percentage increases, generally the sugar percentage will decrease. Because of this, the chocolate will obviously be less sweet, so many people who consider themselves chocolate fanatics may find a 90 percent cacao bar far too bitter for their tastes.

That happened to me while I was at the Scharffen Berger factory. I realized I wasn’t a huge fan of the 85 to 90 percent chocolate bars, and so since then I’ve been tasting different percentages to see which seemed to have the best balance for baking. For me personally, I have a strong preference for at least 60 percent bittersweet chocolate to a maximum of 70 percent cacao. These will have a very prominent chocolate taste, but also have just enough sugar for balance.

Mise en place for chocolate lace cookies

There are also many other considerations for what makes great chocolate, such as the process of roasting and the length of time the cacao beans should be roasted, but to simplify things for this recipe, let’s just aim for 60 to 70 percent cacao in the chocolate you use as the filling, and we’ll be good to go.

After we visited the Scharffen Berger factory, I went to their website to see what kinds of chocolate recipes they had. Out of all of them, the chocolate lace cookie seemed to stand out — it’s an elegant, delicate cookie, the kind of cookie you would see in bakeries and think to yourself, “How pretty! Those look too difficult to make at home…”

lace cookies out of the oven

My friend was the first to make these cookies, and when she presented them as a gift to me, I couldn’t stop talking about how beautiful they were and decided that I had to try making them. I wasn’t as successful as she was, though, for one big reason: I didn’t use parchment paper the first time. This is a BIG tip in the recipe that you cannot overlook when baking these — use parchment paper or a silpat. These cookies are so incredibly thin and delicate that if you just grease your cookie sheets, these cookies will not come off. They will simply stick to your pan, and the whole baking process will be a complete waste.

ready to be smeared with chocolate and sandwiched

The second time I made these (with parchment paper!), they were a big success. They were delicate, dainty, and looked like the professional cookies in bake shops. These chocolate lace cookies are the cookies you would make when you want to dazzle someone with your baking skills. Just be patient with them when taking them off the parchment paper after baking and when sandwiching them with chocolate, and they will come out looking like you put in more effort than you really did.

Another tip I have, which I already changed in my adaptation, is to use less sugar. The original recipe calls for 1 cup of sugar, which just seemed like overkill to me, so I used 1/4 less. I also decreased the amount of cinnamon from 1/2 teaspoon to 1/4 teaspoon, as I wanted the almond/oat combination along with the chocolate to shine. Try playing around with the quantities to see what suits your fancy.

finished lace cookies

Chocolate Lace Cookies
Adapted from The Scharffen Berger Recipe Collection
Yields about 40 cookies

• 8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter
• 1/2 cup blanched almonds
• 1/2 cup rolled oats
• 3/4 cup sugar
• 1 large egg, lightly beaten
• 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
• 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
• 1/2 teaspoon salt
• 4 ounces 60 to 70 percent Cacao Bittersweet Chocolate

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line baking sheets with Silpats or parchment paper.

Blanch the almonds by putting them in boiling water for 3 minutes and then immediately rinsing in cold water. The skins will pop off. Dry the almonds with paper towels.

In a food processor, place the almonds and pulse until coarsely chopped. Add the rolled oats. Continue pulsing until finely chopped, but not ground as finely as a powder.

Melt the butter. Let it cool slightly.

In a medium bowl, mix together the melted butter, sugar, egg, almond mixture, vanilla extract, salt and cinnamon. Stir to combine.

Drop the batter by teaspoon onto baking sheets. Leave two inches between cookies. Bake until brown, approximately 8 minutes. Cool completely on a wire rack.

In the top of a double boiler or in a bowl placed over simmering water, melt the chocolate. When the cookies are cooled, gently separate them from the Silpat or parchment and flip so the smooth side is facing up. With a spatula, gently spread each cookie with some melted chocolate. Sandwich the cookies together and serve.

Finished cookies can be stored between sheets of waxed paper or foil in an airtight container for up to a week.

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  • None
  • itsgrant: I want to goooo! Me next vacation, hopefully
  • Jesslyn: Thank you so much for posting this! My husband (who spent several years in Korea) and I have been searching for a good recipe that will produce Ho Duc
  • Didi: I have been searching everywhere for a recipe for this dish and this was spot on!! Thanks for making me and my boyfriend VERY happy :)

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