I love butter and sugar.

Posts Tagged ‘Cookies

It’s been over two years since I have updated this blog. I stopped mainly because my new job at the time was forcing me to work long hours, and also because it already required me to be in front of a computer for so many hours of the day that once the weekend came, the last thing I wanted to do was be in front of a computer again.

A lot of things have happened in the last two years – lots of new experiences, realizations, and traveling. The most recent and notable travel experience I have had was my first time in Western Europe (France, Italy, Greece, and Turkey). I spent two and a half weeks this summer exploring Europe, and my first stop was in Paris. I’d wanted to come to Paris for as long as I could remember, and this past summer, it finally became a reality. When I had to chose a language to study in freshman year of high school, I unhesitatingly chose French. Although those language skills are close to dead now, during those four years studying French, I gained a deep love of French culture and ways of life. The “je ne sais quoi” leisurely lifestyle and appreciation of fine art and gastronomy were big reasons I’ve been so drawn to French culture. In my mind, the French have a deep understanding of the most important thing in life, and that is the art of living and living well.

Paris is a city that likes to enjoy a glass of wine at every meal, a city that relishes its two-hour lunch breaks, and a city that encourages seeing and walking to appreciate her complete beauty. She is a city that is somehow so green that when I look around at all the lush, vibrant shrubs and trees that have been trimmed and hedged to perfection, I sometimes think that someone just took a can of forest and pine green spray paint and had a field day running through her streets.

Our first night, we walked from the Champs-Elysees to the Tour Eiffel. Although I had seen it so many times in TV shows, movies, postcards, and photos, seeing the Tour Eiffel in person was like a revelation. I was so stunned by its massive size, curves, and light. I felt different emotions as I walked around it and along the Seine, but most of all, I felt an overwhelming sense of gratitude – gratitude for the fact that I was so privileged to be able to visit one of the most stunning cities in the world, gratitude for all of my life’s experiences, both painful and happy, and gratitude for the people who I have loved and who have loved me and contributed to who I am now. In a city I had never before visited, I began to feel nostalgic and introspective.

As these feelings of nostalgia and introspection fell upon me, I realized exactly how much I missed writing, and almost every day that I was in Europe, I blocked out an hour or two to write about my experiences and feelings while there. In some way, you could say that going to Europe helped me find a part of myself again. Traveling through such beauty gave me an overwhelming sense of gratefulness and happiness in a way that I’d never experienced before.

Paris is one of those places that people visit and have extremely high expectations for. We hope it will live up to all of the hype that television shows and movies have built around it. We expect every building to be stunning and colossal, every work of art to be breathtaking, and every croissant to be buttery, flaky, and melt in your mouth.

Well, not every building was stunning, not every sculpture and painting I saw was breathtaking, and (extremely unfortunately) not every croissant I had was flaky, but I will say that Paris lived up to all of my expectations, particularly when it comes to all things epicurean.

One of the first things I always think about when I remember Paris is Ladurée, the most luxurious and refined pastry and cookie shop in Paris. Ladurée has several locations in Paris and around the world in major metropolitan cities, and just recently (to my absolute giddy delight) opened a shop right here in New York on the Upper East Side. Everything about Ladurée is chic and exquisite, from the jewel-like decor of each shop to the elegant, posh gift boxes (which you have to pay extra for, but if you are a die-hard fan, you should probably just cave in and get one…or two). Ladurée is famous for all of their chocolates, cakes, and sweets, but they are most renowned for their macarons – a cookie made of two little almond meringues sandwiched with a filing between them. Please don’t confuse these with those American coconut cookies. What makes these little sandwich cookies so amazing? Take a look:

The perfect macaron, when you bite into it, should have a small crunch, and then as your teeth dig deeper into it, should be lighter than air. The ideal macaron is light and delicate; it is a meringue, after all, that was piped from a pastry bag, left to sit for a few hours to develop the “shell” on its top to create that tiny crunch in the initial bite. The fillings vary depending on which flavor you get. I can’t decide if I prefer the richer fillings like pistachio or hazelnut cream or the lighter ones like raspberry or orange.

In addition to getting macarons from Ladurée, we also tried them at Eric Kayser and Pierre Herme. The most unique macaron flavor we had was from Pierre Herme – olive oil and vanilla bean. The strong perfume of vanilla was unmistakable, but with the hints of fruity olive oil, the flavor was pretty sensational. You can even see the specs of vanilla bean in the cream filling here.

The Eric Kayser macarons were satisfactory, but honestly, they paled in comparison to the ones we had at Ladurée and Pierre Herme. However, their mini pistachio flavored financiers were incredibly cute and dainty with just the right amount of sweet almond nuttiness.

Oftentimes when friends have come back from France, they say that the cookies and croissants always taste better there than they do here in the States, even when they are thinking about their favorite pastry shops here. I used to think that this was just because they had such great memories of their travels and wanted to immortalize those epicurean experiences in their minds, but then I read an article a few years back that noted that laws in different countries surrounding butterfat (yes, butterfat laws; there really are regulations around this stuff) actually did make buttery baked goods different depending on where you are eating them. By law in the United States, American butter must contain at least 80 percent butterfat, while the minimum for French butter is 82 percent. Many companies in France that make butter even use 83-86 percent butterfat! A few percentage points might not sound like a big deal, but butterfat is the main determinant of butter’s flavor and texture, so every small bit counts.

The best croissant, baguette, and madeleines I had were from a bakery within walking distance of the Sacre Coeur cathedral called Le Grenier à Pain. Apparently in 2010, they won first place for the best baguette in the 17th annual best baguette contest in Paris at la Chambre de Commerce des Boulangers. The croissant was one of the flakiest croissants I’ve ever eaten, with a texture so light that I probably could have stood there and eaten 10 of them without even realizing it. The crunchy exterior was almost addictive.

Many milk and butter companies in the States, such as Vermont Butter & Cheese Company, are trying to use methods to make butter to mimic the tastes and textures of European butter. They actually make butter with 86 percent butterfat. I still haven’t tried it yet, but I intend on doing it sometime soon. Maybe if I do try it out with the next baked good I make, I will succeed at producing a madeleine that was as tasty as this one at Le Grenier à Pain:

France is a carb lover’s dream – everywhere you go, you are surrounded by the most amazing and decadent cookies, cakes, pastries, and breads. Most of the notable bread places we found were along the way to the Sacre Coeur. For our picnic that day, we bought a gorgeous loaf of olive bread from Boulangerie à L’Ancienne.

This place churns out baguette, madeleines, and other pastries and breads all day long. We even saw a man in the front of the shop shaping baguettes. If I had timed him, it probably took him about 15 seconds per loaf to shape and throw each baguette onto the industrial-sized baking sheets. We used our olive bread to make sandwiches that day, and it was probably one of the best olive breads I’ve had. The olives had just the right amount of saltiness, and the bread was soft yet springy. With our pâté and cheeses, these sandwiches made the perfect lunch.

In the midst of all of the croissants, baguettes, and macarons, we still needed to have some real meals while in Paris. To be honest, while we did eat at a few good places with great steak frites, creme brulee, and charcuterie, none of them were particularly memorable or worth writing home about. The one exception to this was our visit to the much loved Mariage Frères Maison de Thé.

For our last lunch in Paris before jetting off to Rome, I knew we had to visit one of the best tea houses in the world. Mariage Frères has several locations in Paris, as well as in Germany and Japan. Mariage Frères is known by tea connoisseurs for its large selection of teas imported from around the world. Each store is laid out in an apothecary style that makes you feel like you are about to make a purchase that might heal an ailment of some sort that you have. We visited the location in Rive Gauche, which is quietly tucked away on a side street in the area.

If you visit one of the tea salons like we did, you can have the privilege of enjoying your own pot of their spectacular tea in a relaxing, beautiful setting. In addition, you can also have breakfast, brunch, or pastries and cake here. Of the prix fixe brunch selections (all in French, so practice your reading and speaking skills!) listed, we choose the Green Line and the Lucky Melodies.

The Green Line came with a beef filet tartare, a gazpacho, and a salad of long, elegant romaine leaves and roasted, marinated tomatoes, a glass of Mariages Frere’s very own namesake champagne. Lucky Melodies came with a chicken salad that redefined chicken salad for me – a mix of beautifully cut romaine leaves, radicchio, large slices of chicken breast, red beets, with an intensely fruity olive oil and nut dressing. This salad was like a work of art. Both sets came with freshly squeezed grapefruit and orange juice, a buttery berry scone, and a fruit muffin with Mariage Frères tea-infused fruit jellies and butter.

For tea, he had a Sweet Shanghai – a subtle green tea with lychee notes – iced, and I had the Rose d’Himalaya, a first flush Darjeeling tea perfumed with rose petals. The deep red color of the Rose d’Himalaya was so gorgeous in my little tea cup. For dessert, we shared a slice of the matcha green tea tart, which was intensely green tea flavored and silky, and a yuzu tart, which was extremely tart. I don’t think there was a single thing that we did not enjoy the taste or presentation of in this meal. Even the service was impeccable.

The highlights for the meal were the fruit and tea-infused jams, the chicken salad, the beef tartare, the flute of champagne, which had more depth and complexity than any other glass of champagne or prosecco I’ve ever tasted, and the green tea tart.

The jams we had with our scones and muffins were amazing. Both had citrusy, floral notes and were infused with tea, and the texture resembled more of a thick jelly than a jam. Every aspect of this meal at the tea salon was memorable, and when I look back on Paris, this was definitely one of the most unforgettable parts of the trip.

Writing about Paris makes me miss it even more and want to impulsively book a flight to go back there just to sit and linger in the tea salon, enjoying a cup of tea and a scone with one of those succulent fruit gelées. In some ways, my outlook on life has been changed by the time I spent in Europe. There are a lot of little joys in life that we take for granted, and sometimes when things get very chaotic and busy, we tend to forget those little things that make life so amazing. Maybe we would all be a little bit happier and more satisfied if we could just take a short break from this everyday life we live, jet off to Paris, and experience an afternoon of respite in a tea salon as tranquil and beautiful as Mariage Frères’.

Whatever you do when you go to Paris, make sure that you indulge in as many croissants, macarons, baguettes, and tea (if that is your fancy) as possible. Eating in Paris is an experience in itself that everyone should embrace. I certainly did.

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Chocolate Lace Cookies

In January 2005, a friend and I went to visit the Scharffen Berger chocolate factory in Berkeley, CA, just to see what the chocolate making process was all about. Both of us were dessert and baking fanatics who love chocolate and the Bay Area, and we wanted to visit one of the many, many places that made the Bay Area known for its local goods and artisan treats.

The thing that struck me the most about Scharffen Berger was that it was the very first chocolate company I’d heard of that made a point to tell you how much actual cacao, in percentage terms, there was in their chocolate (then again, I wasn’t a big foodie at the time, so I had no clue that amazing chocolate companies like Varlhona existed). Even fancier companies like Ghirardelli at that point in time didn’t tell you how much there was, and it really matters since the more cacao there is in a piece of chocolate, the more intense your chocolate experience will be.

Blanched and de-skinned almonds

Going on the Scharffen Berger factory tour, I was completely appalled to find out that in order to legally call a piece of milk chocolate “chocolate,” the piece must have at least 10 percent cocoa solids. Yes, you read that right — just 10 percent. A question that might pop into your mind would be — if your milk chocolate bar is only 10 percent chocolate, what’s the other 90 percent consist of? Well, it’s most likely sugar, milk, cocoa butter, lecithins and other emulsifiers. Sounds like a lot of filler to me. The American FDA requirements for bittersweet, semisweet, and dark chocolate are a bit stricter, as bittersweet and semisweet must consist of at least 35 percent cacao, while dark chocolate must have at least 50 percent cacao. So for baking, I’d definitely stick with the bittersweet or dark chocolate over the milk chocolate.

Grinding the de-skinned almonds with oats

Chocolate is pretty complex, though, as a higher percentage of cacao will not necessarily mean better taste. As the cacao percentage increases, generally the sugar percentage will decrease. Because of this, the chocolate will obviously be less sweet, so many people who consider themselves chocolate fanatics may find a 90 percent cacao bar far too bitter for their tastes.

That happened to me while I was at the Scharffen Berger factory. I realized I wasn’t a huge fan of the 85 to 90 percent chocolate bars, and so since then I’ve been tasting different percentages to see which seemed to have the best balance for baking. For me personally, I have a strong preference for at least 60 percent bittersweet chocolate to a maximum of 70 percent cacao. These will have a very prominent chocolate taste, but also have just enough sugar for balance.

Mise en place for chocolate lace cookies

There are also many other considerations for what makes great chocolate, such as the process of roasting and the length of time the cacao beans should be roasted, but to simplify things for this recipe, let’s just aim for 60 to 70 percent cacao in the chocolate you use as the filling, and we’ll be good to go.

After we visited the Scharffen Berger factory, I went to their website to see what kinds of chocolate recipes they had. Out of all of them, the chocolate lace cookie seemed to stand out — it’s an elegant, delicate cookie, the kind of cookie you would see in bakeries and think to yourself, “How pretty! Those look too difficult to make at home…”

lace cookies out of the oven

My friend was the first to make these cookies, and when she presented them as a gift to me, I couldn’t stop talking about how beautiful they were and decided that I had to try making them. I wasn’t as successful as she was, though, for one big reason: I didn’t use parchment paper the first time. This is a BIG tip in the recipe that you cannot overlook when baking these — use parchment paper or a silpat. These cookies are so incredibly thin and delicate that if you just grease your cookie sheets, these cookies will not come off. They will simply stick to your pan, and the whole baking process will be a complete waste.

ready to be smeared with chocolate and sandwiched

The second time I made these (with parchment paper!), they were a big success. They were delicate, dainty, and looked like the professional cookies in bake shops. These chocolate lace cookies are the cookies you would make when you want to dazzle someone with your baking skills. Just be patient with them when taking them off the parchment paper after baking and when sandwiching them with chocolate, and they will come out looking like you put in more effort than you really did.

Another tip I have, which I already changed in my adaptation, is to use less sugar. The original recipe calls for 1 cup of sugar, which just seemed like overkill to me, so I used 1/4 less. I also decreased the amount of cinnamon from 1/2 teaspoon to 1/4 teaspoon, as I wanted the almond/oat combination along with the chocolate to shine. Try playing around with the quantities to see what suits your fancy.

finished lace cookies

Chocolate Lace Cookies
Adapted from The Scharffen Berger Recipe Collection
Yields about 40 cookies

• 8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter
• 1/2 cup blanched almonds
• 1/2 cup rolled oats
• 3/4 cup sugar
• 1 large egg, lightly beaten
• 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
• 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
• 1/2 teaspoon salt
• 4 ounces 60 to 70 percent Cacao Bittersweet Chocolate

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line baking sheets with Silpats or parchment paper.

Blanch the almonds by putting them in boiling water for 3 minutes and then immediately rinsing in cold water. The skins will pop off. Dry the almonds with paper towels.

In a food processor, place the almonds and pulse until coarsely chopped. Add the rolled oats. Continue pulsing until finely chopped, but not ground as finely as a powder.

Melt the butter. Let it cool slightly.

In a medium bowl, mix together the melted butter, sugar, egg, almond mixture, vanilla extract, salt and cinnamon. Stir to combine.

Drop the batter by teaspoon onto baking sheets. Leave two inches between cookies. Bake until brown, approximately 8 minutes. Cool completely on a wire rack.

In the top of a double boiler or in a bowl placed over simmering water, melt the chocolate. When the cookies are cooled, gently separate them from the Silpat or parchment and flip so the smooth side is facing up. With a spatula, gently spread each cookie with some melted chocolate. Sandwich the cookies together and serve.

Finished cookies can be stored between sheets of waxed paper or foil in an airtight container for up to a week.

Financiers

I still have quite a bit of almonds in my pantry, so I thought I’d continue the almond cookie extravaganza and try out the financier recipe in Dorie Greenspan’s Paris Sweets. I’d never had the pleasure of enjoying a financier until about two months ago when Blueberry brought me to T.W. Foods, where at the end of our meal two miniature financier cookies in the shape of madeleines accompanied the check. One bite into this cookie, and I knew I had to call the waitress back to our table and ask her what this little buttery delight was called…

And that was how I learned that I loved financiers.

financiers - mise en place

In a nutshell, financiers came about when a famous Parisian pastry chef named Lasne, whose patisserie was close to the Bourse, Paris’s stock exchange, recognized a problem among his affluent clients: though they were discriminating in taste, they were always in a hurry and rarely had time to sit and enjoy one of his many confections. So Lasne designed this little cake-like cookie so that it could be eaten on the run without the risk of crumbling all over a freshly pressed suit or tie and without a need for a fork or spoon. As Greenspan calls it, financiers are like the “high-class fast food.”

Putting batter into molds

Financiers are as rich as the bankers that they were named for, simply made with ground almonds, sugar, unwhipped egg whites, flour, and a very generous amount of melted butter, which is cooked until it is golden brown. They are traditionally baked in pans that have flat rectangular molds — the reason for this was that the bakers wanted them to resemble little treasured bars of gold — but they are often baked in small boat-shaped molds, madeleine molds, as well as mini muffin pans (especially for people who are not willing to invest in a financier mold pan). My madeleine pan is at my parents’ house, and since I wasn’t willing to buy a real financier mold, I settled on making them in a mini muffin pan — not that I’m dissatisfied at all because I think they turned out quite cute.

Financiers just out of the oven

These cookies are simple, sweet, and tender, resembling mini cakes rather than cookies. Their nutty flavor comes not only from the ground almonds but especially from the browned butter. When making the browned butter, be sure to keep a close watch over it as it bubbles — aim for a golden brown that is not too dark. If you glance away for just a few seconds, your butter could easy go from brown to black. I’d also recommend using a stainless steel pot to brown the butter instead of a non-stick black bottomed pot; this way, it’s easier for you to watch the butter change color.

Another thing I’d suggest is doubling the recipe — after you taste one of these, I’m sure you’ll have wished that you made more.

Financiers on a pretty plate

Financiers
Adapted from Dorie Greenspan’s Paris Sweets, whose recipe came from Paris’s famous Boulangerie-Patisserie Poujauran
Makes 12 cookies in financier molds, or 24 cookies in mini muffin pans

1 1/2 sticks (6 ounces) unsalted butter
1 cup minus two tablespoons sugar
1 cup ground, toasted almonds
6 large egg whites
2/3 cup all-purpose flour

Put the butter in a small saucepan and bring it to a boil over medium heat, swirling the pan occasionally.  Allow the butter to bubble away until it turns a deep brown, but don’t turn your back on the pan – the difference between brown and black is measured in seconds.  Pull the pan from the heat and keep it in a warm place.

Mix the sugar and almonds together in a medium saucepan.  Stir in the egg whites, place the pan over low heat, and, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, heat the mixture until it is runny, slightly white and hot to the touch, about 2 minutes.  Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the flour, then gradually mix in the melted butter.  Transfer the batter to a bowl, cover with plastic wrap, pressing it against the surface of the batter to create an airtight seal, and chill for at least 1 hour.  (The batter can be kept covered in the refrigerator for up to 3 days).

Center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).  Butter 12 rectangular financier molds (1 pan with 3-3/4 x 2 x 5/8-inch [10 x 5 x 1-1/2-cm] rectangular molds that each hold 3 tablespoons, or you can use a mini muffin pan like I did), dust the interiors with flour and tap out the excess.  Place the molds on a baking sheet for easy transport.

Fill each mold almost to the top with batter.  Slide the molds into the oven and bake for about 12-13 minutes, or until the financiers are golden, crowned and springy to the touch.  If necessary, run a blunt knife between the cookies and the sides of the pans, then turn the cookies out of their molds and allow them to cool to room temperature right side up on cooling racks.

Note: Although the batter can be kept in the refrigerator for up to three days, financiers are best enjoyed the day they are baked.

Mexican Wedding Cookies after dusting

I’ve been perusing all of the cookie and dessert recipes that I have to pick out recipes that will allow me to put a bigger dent into the five-pound bag of almonds that I have, and I came across one cookie recipe for which I’ve often received compliments: Mexican wedding cookies.

According to traditional Mexican culture, when a couple is married, each of these cookies is wrapped in brightly colored tissue paper, or papel de china, as it is called in Mexico. The cookies are then piled into baskets or cellophane bags and tied with silk ribbons. They are then passed out at the wedding dinner to guests. Although incredibly laborious in terms of the careful packaging and homemade nature of cookie baking, preparing these cookies is an old custom — one that is much loved by those who are lucky enough to receive them as treats.

Grinding almonds with flour

But who says you have to go to a Mexican wedding to enjoy these tasty delights? I’ve made them for my family and friends numerous times, and I knew that they were a winner when my uncle, who usually happily eats the cookies I’ve made for him in silence, e-mailed me shortly after I sent him away with a bag of these cookies and wrote, “What on earth are those little cookies with powdered sugar on them called? They’re amazing!” If someone writes to you to point out how great a cookie is, it must be good. So now whenever I see him and have access to baking supplies, I always make sure to bake a mini batch just for him.

I originally found this recipe in a feature story written by Jacqueline Higuera McMahan in the San Francisco Chronicle several years ago. Lamenting the disappearance of old customs due to the passage of time and the modernization of today’s society, McMahan wanted to revive the tradition of making Mexican wedding cookies when her son was to marry. In her small kitchen all within one day’s time, she handmade 300 of these sweets. Three-hundred! Some of you will think it’s ridiculous to labor over something so seemingly frivolous, but I consider that an act of love.

Dough before chilling

You can use either pecans or almonds to make these cookies, but I’m sure that if you use pecans, the cookie will be a bit richer because the natural fat content of pecans is a higher. McMahan uses vanilla and almond extracts as her main flavoring additions, but I’ve read that you can also use other flavored extracts or even kahlua.

Wedding cookies before powdered sugar dusting

The recipe itself isn’t that clear regarding how to shape the cookies, so I’ll share what I usually do: I’ll take a walnut-sized (the actual shell size, not the itty nut itself!), roll it into a ball, and then flatten it just slightly onto the cookie sheet. The sheets do not need to be greased since the butter content is very high.

The resulting cookie is very crumbly, dry, and lightly sweetened by a small amount of powdered sugar in the dough as well as on the tops. These cookies are best enjoyed with a cup of coffee or tea, or as a slightly indulgent snack anytime during the day.

Mexican wedding cookies

Mexican Wedding Cookies
From Jacqueline Higuera McMahan’s California Rancho Cooking
Yields 33-35 cookies

  • 1 cup pecans or almonds, toasted
  • 2 cups all-purpose unbleached flour
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 cup unsalted butter, slightly softened
  • 1/2 cup powdered sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla
  • 1/4 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 1/4 cups powdered sugar placed in sifter for dusting cookies

Place the toasted nuts, 1 cup of the flour and a pinch of salt into the bowl of a food processor. Lightly grind. The nuts do not have to be really fine. The flour keeps the nuts from becoming too pasty.

In the bowl of a mixer, place the butter and powdered sugar. Beat until well combined, then add the vanilla and almond extracts. Beat just to mix, and then begin adding the flour-nut mixture by 1/2 cupfuls.

Blend in the remaining 1 cup flour and mix just until a dough is formed. If there are dry bits at the bottom of the bowl, use a large spoon to blend or blend with your hands. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and chill the dough for 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 350°.

Place walnut-size pieces of dough on Silpat or a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake for about 18 minutes, or until the edges of the cookies are golden. Cool on racks for 10 minutes.

Dust a sheet of waxed paper with powdered sugar. Place the cookies on top of the sugar and sift more powdered sugar over all. Let them cool and then store in tins. Serve as is or wrap each cookie in an 8-inch square of colored tissue like red, pink, blue, yellow and purple.

Amandines A L'Anciennes

I’ve recently become a happy and proud recipient of a five-pound bag of California-grown almonds, courtesy of Blueberry and his much beloved Costco membership. Stores that we love and will continue to love include Trader Joe’s, Costco, and any place that sells 83 percent-plus butterfat butter/Mariage Frères tea (me) or the purest, fruitiest Italian olive oils (Blueberry).

Mixing 3 ingredients

I’ve always loved almonds, particularly right after they’ve been toasted and the air is filled with a subtle, sweet, nutty aroma. They are one of the most versatile nuts for baking and pair amazingly well with almost every fruit imaginable. They are amazing whole, sliced, ground, chopped, and somehow they always look so elegant just simply on their own. It’s like they were meant to be showcased in dessert.

Four ingredient batter

Today I’m not really going to wow anyone with the dessert that I’ve made with a small part of that five-pound bag – I actually wanted to make something simple with just a few ingredients to allow that pure almond flavor to really shine through. The first dessert that came to mind was the old-fashioned almond cookie made the French way with only three ingredients: almonds, sugar, and egg whites.

This cookie is like the French macaron’s far less fussy sister – yes, it uses ground almonds, but it doesn’t need any piping from a pastry bag, nor do the cookie drops need to rest and develop a skin before baking the way a traditional macaron would. You don’t even need an electric mixer or a whisk – just a fork to stir together the ingredients and you’d be good to go. I’ve copied the recipe below from the book, but what I actually did was I ground the almonds in a food processor, then mixed that in a bowl with the sugar, cinnamon, and egg whites. I did this because my food processor wasn’t big enough, but if you’d like, you could just follow the recipe’s directions. I also adjusted the sugar (the original recipe calls for 1 cup, but I used 2/3 cup).

Batter on parchment paper on baking sheets

I found these cookies in a popular dessert book put together by Dorie Greenspan, who gallivanted all over Paris to find the most exquisite and loved desserts that the city of love (and sweets) had to offer. This recipe is from Arnaud Larher’s patisserie, where the batter is used to not only make these cookies but also to fill tartlets. Greenspan suggests either eating them au naturel or flavored with a little cinnamon, cocoa, or nuts. This time around I decided to add a half teaspoon of cinnamon to the mix, and I loved it (and so did Blueberry). They go great with coffee, tea, or just plain by themselves. This is as pure as an almond cookie can get.

Plated almond cookies

Old-Fashioned Almond Cookies (Amandines à L’Anciennes)
From Dorie Greenspan’s Paris Sweets
Makes about 24 cookies

  • 8½ ounces (just under 2 cups) toasted and blanched almonds
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, 3 tablespoons (20 grams) unsweetened cocoa powder, and/or 1 cup (50 grams) finely chopped pecans, to flavor (optional)
  • 3 large egg whites, lightly beaten with a fork

Position the racks to divide the oven into thirds and preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C). Line two baking sheets with parchment paper and keep them close at hand.

Put the almonds and sugar in the work bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade and pulse, scraping down the sides of the bowl now and then, until the almonds are finely ground, about 2 minutes. If you are using cinnamon or cocoa, put it in now and pulse to blend. If you are using chopped pecans, wait to add them after all the other ingredients have been added.

With the processor running, add the egg whites in a steady stream. Mix about 30 seconds, only until the egg whites are blended into the almonds and sugar— you don’t want to incorporate too much air into the batter. Add the pecans, if you are using them, and pulse just to mix.

Spoon out a level tablespoon of batter for each cookie, spacing the cookies about 1 inch (2.5 cm) apart on the lined baking sheets. Slide the baking sheets into the oven and bake for 18 to 20 minutes, rotating the sheets front to back and top to bottom at the halfway point. The cookies should puff, firm, and turn lightly brown around the edges. With a wide metal spatula, carefully lift the cookies off the baking sheets and onto cooling racks to cool to room temperature.



  • None
  • itsgrant: I want to goooo! Me next vacation, hopefully
  • Jesslyn: Thank you so much for posting this! My husband (who spent several years in Korea) and I have been searching for a good recipe that will produce Ho Duc
  • Didi: I have been searching everywhere for a recipe for this dish and this was spot on!! Thanks for making me and my boyfriend VERY happy :)

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